4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Learning How to Code

A lot of people want to learn how to code these days, but they have no idea what they’re getting into. Sure, programmers can make good money if they know what they’re doing, but too many people are hopping on the bandwagon without giving it proper thought. computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science

Over the past few years, a deceptive mantra has developed — one that says that anyone can learn how to code, therefore everyone should learn a popular programming language. Newbies are tricked into thinking that a few months on Codecademy and FreeCodeCamp is all it takes to become a master coder.

But that’s simply not true. In fact, many people who dive into programming end up regretting it, mainly because it’s not what they expected and they’re quickly overwhelmed. To avoid that, ask yourself the following questions and be honest.

Problem solving is the heart of programming. There are many aspects to the problem solving process, but at the very core of every successful programmer is an internal drive to create solutions and to fix things that are broken.

They say that a programmer spends 10% of his time writing bugs and 90% of his time fixing those bugs — and every person in the world who has done any amount of serious coding can relate to that. It’s truer than you know: programming is the art of debugging.

Anyone can learn the syntax of a programming language. Anyone can learn the nuances of an integrated development environment. Anyone can think of a cool new app idea. But to encounter bug after bug and not lose heart? That takes a special kind of personality.

The kind of programmer who succeeds is the one who can run into a weird compiler error, a buggy code library, or a confusing language feature and be self-driven enough to search for an answer. A successful programmer is one who’s not only willing but compelled to spend hours seeking a solution, and won’t be satisfied until it’s found.

Here’s another way to think of it: extrinsic versus intrinsic motivations. Do you want to be a programmer because you want the rewards? Or do you want to be a programmer because you love the process? If not the latter, then maybe it isn’t the right path for you.

Prev1 of 4Next

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *